Reintegration of child soldiers (SERACAF-IV)

Project Overview

Country

South Sudan

Project name

SERACAF Phase IV

Project status

Finished

Duration of the project

Start: 01.05.2018
End: 30.04.2019
11 months

Budget

CHF 939’877

In collaboration with

UNICEF

Project area

Topics

Tags

Background

Former Greater Pibor Administrative Area (GPAA) and former Unity State are among the regions in the country which have seen recent escalation of armed conflict, compounded by chronic cycles of inter-communal violence, cattle rustling, child abductions, population displacements and revenge killings. The conflict hits women, girls, boys and men hard. Subsequently, most vulnerable and/or at risk and displaced populations, continue to face grave human rights violations that include killings, unlawful detentions, looting/destruction of property, separation, dangers of mines and unexploded ammunitions, sexual and gender-based violence, forced marriages and forced recruitment, including children, in the armed forces and groups. The conflict has taken a heavy toll on boys and men who have been forcefully recruited by armed groups and forces, and on women and girls who are often abducted to serve as wives/cooks.

Project

VSF-Suisse supports the socio-economic reintegration of former child soldiers by offering them various apprenticeship programs, meaning that they learn to earn a living independently. For example, mechanics, hairdressers and lay doctors are trained and courses are offered in livestock breeding, beekeeping and tailoring. Once the training is over, children and youths receive material support and mentorship to successfully set up a business. thus they learn to earn a living independently. Younger children receive goats or sheep to ensure the subsistence of their families These measures help former child soldiers to reintegrate into their family and communities.

VSF-Suisse also trains parents and children in peace building, thus strengthening child protection. Through these trainings, children and youths become ambassadors for peace in their communities.

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